New York LBDC

New York: LBDC event on Tuesday 11 November, 2014

nyc5Good afternoon,

I hope you are well.

I am very excited about the  LBDC  (Lawyers’ Business Development Club”) returning to NEW YORK on Tuesday 11 November, 2014.

This will be our third  LBDC  guest speaker event in New York.

Guest Speaker : Maria Konnikova (author of Mastermind)

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Our Guest Speaker will be MARIA KONNIKOVA author of “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes” (a New York Times bestseller).

Maria’s book has been praised as follows:

-“Engaging and insightful.” —Steven Pinker

-“Delightfully intelligent.” —Carl Zimmer

-“Ingenious.” —The Wall Street Journal

“Entertaining blend of Holmesiana and modern-day neuroscience.” —The New York Times

Talk

MARIA KONNIKOVA’s  Talk will be entitled:   “How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes”.

About Mastermind

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“No fictional character is more renowned for his powers of thought and observation than Sherlock Holmes. But is his extraordinary intellect merely a gift of fiction, or can we learn to cultivate these abilities ourselves, to improve our lives at work and at home?

We can, says psychologist and journalist Maria Konnikova, and in Mastermind she shows us how. Beginning with the “brain attic”–Holmes’s metaphor for how we store information and organize knowledge–Konnikova unpacks the mental strategies that lead to clearer thinking and deeper insights. Drawing on twenty-first-century neuroscience and psychology, Mastermind explores Holmes’s unique methods of ever-present mindfulness, astute observation, and logical deduction. In doing so, it shows how each of us, with some self-awareness and a little practice, can employ these same methods to sharpen our perceptions, solve difficult problems, and enhance our creative powers.”

 Maria Konnikova: Biography

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Maria is a contributing writer for The New Yorker online, where she writes a weekly column with a focus on psychology and science, and is currently working on an assortment of non-fiction and fiction projects.

Her first book, Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes (Viking/Penguin, 2013), was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into seventeen languages. Her second book, on the psychology of the con, is scheduled for publication by Viking/Penguin next winter.

Her writing has appeared online and in print in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, Slate, The New Republic, The Paris Review, The Wall Street Journal, Salon, The Boston Globe, The Observer, Scientific American MIND, WIRED, and Scientific American, among numerous other publications. Maria blogs regularly for The New Yorker and formerly wrote the “Literally Psyched” column for Scientific American and the popular psychology blog “Artful Choice” for Big Think.

She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, where she studied psychology, creative writing, and government, and received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Columbia University.

She previously worked as a producer for the Charlie Rose show on PBS.

Praise for Mastermind

“Entertaining blend of Holmesiana and modern-day neuroscience.”

Katherine Bouton, The New York Times

“Ingenious…thoughtful…covers a wide variety of material clearly and organizes it well.”

Matthew Hutson, The Wall Street Journal

“Steven Pinker meets Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in this entertaining, insightful look at how the fictional London crime-solver used sophisticated mental strategies to solve complex problems of logic and detection…practical, enjoyable book, packed with modern science.”

—The Boston Globe

“A treatise on how the Watsons of the world can smarten up…culled from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original works and cutting-edge psych research.”

New York Post, “Required Reading”

“Devotees of Arthur Conan Doyle’s conundrum-cracker will be thrilled by this portmanteau of strategies for sharpening cognitive ability.”

Nature

“Weaving together the fictional detective’s cases and modern day neuroscience…important for solving cases or simply staying sharp as we age.”

—Psychology Today

“Based on modern neuroscience and psychology, the book explores Holmes’s aptitude for mindfulness, logical thinking and observation…shares strategies that can lead to clearer thinking…help people become more self-aware”.

—Washington Post

Host:  Clifford Chance (New York)

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I am delighted that Clifford Chance (the global law firm) will again host our breakfast talk in November at their offices: 31 West 52nd Street, New York.

Clifford Chance kindly hosted our previous LBDC event in New York on Wednesday 18, June 2014.

Details of our previous event are on this link here.

Event Details

Guest Speaker:   Maria Konnikova – author of “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes”

Talk: “How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes”

Date: Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Time: 8.30 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. (breakfast will be available from 8.00 a.m.).

Venue: Clifford Chance

Address: Clifford Chance, 31 West 52nd Street, New York

RSVP

I would be be delighted to see you at the LBDC  in New York.

Email

Please email me (Colin Carroll:  colin@lawyersbdc.com) if you would like to reserve a place.   Please note that places will be strictly limited and will be offered on a first-come-first-served basis.

New York

nyc4I look forward to seeing you a the  LBDC  in New York.

For those new to the  LBDC,  all our Talks are very relaxed and informal so I am sure you will enjoy it.

If you plan on attending our event, please make sure to say hello to me (Colin Carroll) on the morning and I will introduce you to some of our other  LBDC  guests.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Colin Carroll

on behalf of the  LBDC     (“Lawyers’ Business Development Club”)

 

CEO

LBDC (“Lawyers’ Business Development Club”)

London │ Dublin │ New York

Telephone: 0044 7917 301 070

Email: colin@lawyersbdc.com

Website: http://www.lawyersbdc.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/lawyersbdc

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/colincarroll

 

 

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